Mark Twain

"Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great."

- Mark Twain

Wednesday, January 18, 2017

Build new habits

Healthy Lifestyle:

The best way to build a habit is consistency, so think "same place, same time"  and try to stick with it.

Be flexible, sometimes you may have to change it up. Return to your schedule when convenient. 


Wednesday, January 11, 2017

Ecclesiastes 1:9



What has been will be again, what has been done will be done again; there is nothing new under the sun. 

Ecclesiastes 1:9



Alan Watts Quotes




“Your body does not eliminate poisons by knowing their names. To try to control fear or depression or boredom by calling them names is to resort to superstition of trust in curses and invocations. It is so easy to see why this does not work. Obviously, we try to know, name, and define fear in order to make it “objective,” that is, separate from “I.””


“This is the real secret of life – to be completely engaged with what you are doing in the here and now. And instead of calling it work, realize it is play.”

“The art of living… is neither careless drifting on the one hand nor fearful clinging to the past on the other. It consists in being sensitive to each moment, in regarding it as utterly new and unique, in having the mind open and wholly receptive.”

“We are living in a culture entirely hypnotized by the illusion of time, in which the so-called present moment is felt as nothing but an infintesimal hairline between an all-powerfully causative past and an absorbingly important future. We have no present. Our consciousness is almost completely preoccupied with memory and expectation. We do not realize that there never was, is, nor will be any other experience than present experience. We are therefore out of touch with reality. We confuse the world as talked about, described, and measured with the world which actually is. We are sick with a fascination for the useful tools of names and numbers, of symbols, signs, conceptions and ideas.”

“No valid plans for the future can be made by those who have no capacity for living now.”


“Muddy water is best cleared by leaving it alone.”

“I have realized that the past and future are real illusions, that they exist in the present, which is what there is and all there is.”

“…tomorrow and plans for tomorrow can have no significance at all unless you are in full contact with the reality of the present, since it is in the present and only in the present that you live.”



“The meaning of life is just to be alive. It is so plain and so obvious and so simple. And yet, everybody rushes around in a great panic as if it were necessary to achieve something beyond themselves.”

 

“To have faith is to trust yourself to the water. When you swim you don’t grab hold of the water, because if you do you will sink and drown. Instead you relax, and float.”

“Advice? I don’t have advice. Stop aspiring and start writing. If you’re writing, you’re a writer. Write like you’re a goddamn death row inmate and the governor is out of the country and there’s no chance for a pardon. Write like you’re clinging to the edge of a cliff, white knuckles, on your last breath, and you’ve got just one last thing to say, like you’re a bird flying over us and you can see everything, and please, for God’s sake, tell us something that will save us from ourselves. Take a deep breath and tell us your deepest, darkest secret, so we can wipe our brow and know that we’re not alone. Write like you have a message from the king. Or don’t. Who knows, maybe you’re one of the lucky ones who doesn’t have to.”

On Change


“The more a thing tends to be permanent, the more it tends to be lifeless.”

“The only way to make sense out of change is to plunge into it, move with it, and join the dance.”

“You and I are all as much continuous with the physical universe as a wave is continuous with the ocean.”

“No one is more dangerously insane than one who is sane all the time: he is like a steel bridge without flexibility, and the order of his life is rigid and brittle.”

“Without birth and death, and without the perpetual transmutation of all the forms of life, the world would be static, rhythm-less, undancing, mummified.”

 

“Never pretend to a love which you do not actually feel, for love is not ours to command.”

 

 

“What I am really saying is that you don’t need to do anything, because if you see yourself in the correct way, you are all as much extraordinary phenomenon of nature as trees, clouds, the patterns in running water, the flickering of fire, the arrangement of the stars, and the form of a galaxy. You are all just like that, and there is nothing wrong with you at all.”

“Trying to define yourself is like trying to bite your own teeth.”

“But I’ll tell you what hermits realize. If you go off into a far, far forest and get very quiet, you’ll come to understand that you’re connected with everything.”

“The source of all light is in the eye.”

 

“Technology is destructive only in the hands of people who do not realize that they are one and the same process as the universe.”

On the Universe

“We do not “come into” this world; we come out of it, as leaves from a tree.”
“Only words and conventions can isolate us from the entirely undefinable something which is everything.”
“But I’ll tell you what hermits realize. If you go off into a far, far forest and get very quiet, you’ll come to understand that you’re connected with everything.”
“You are an aperture through which the universe is looking at and exploring itself.”

On Problems

“Problems that remain persistently insoluble should always be suspected as questions asked in the wrong way.

On Zen

“Zen does not confuse spirituality with thinking about God while one is peeling potatoes. Zen spirituality is just to peel the potatoes.”


Who are you really? An amazing lecture given by Alan Watts a British philosopher, writer, and speaker.
Speech extract from "Does it do you, or do you do it" by Alan Watts, courtesy 










The Book of Virtues

  Image result

The Book of Virtues 

by William J. Bennett

Self Discipline, Loyalty, Work, Responsibility. Courage. Compassion. Honesty. Friendship. Perseverance. Faith. Everyone recognizes these traits as essentials of good character. 

In order for our children to develop such traits, we have to offer them examples of good and bad, right and wrong. And the best places to find them are in great works of literature and exemplary stories from history.

William J. Bennett has collected hundreds of stories in The Book of Virtues, an instructive and inspiring anthology that will help children understand and develop character -- and help adults teach them.

From the Bible to American history, from Greek mythology to English poetry, from fairy tales to modern fiction, these stories are a rich mine of moral literacy, a reliable moral reference point that will help anchor our children and ourselves in our culture, our history, and our traditions -- the sources of the ideals by which we wish to live our lives.

Complete with instructive introductions and notes, The Book of Virtues is a book the whole family can read and enjoy -- and learn from -- together.


 Source: https://books.google.ca/books/about/Book_of_Virtues.html?id=ljEXPcTDquQC&source=kp_cover&redir_esc=y&hl=en



Tuesday, January 10, 2017

Clean Energy Progress - Highview Power Storage

Liquid air energy storage sounds futuristic ?

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Mark Arce
Date: Tue, Jan 10, 2017 at 1:22 PM
Subject: Expert Source Available - Indian Point Closure
To: Mark Arce



Source Available

Topic: Indian Point Closure

Source: Richard Riley is the North America Business Development Manager for Highview Power Storage, and based at New York City’s hub for smart cities, smart grid, and clean energy at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering, ACRE.

A mechanical engineer by training, Richard began his career with French utility EDF in the construction and maintenance of power generation assets.

He joined Highview in 2013 to support the development of Liquid Air Energy Storage systems, including the engineering and construction of the company’s 5 MW demonstrator in the north of England.

Richard is a Chartered Engineer, Member of the UK’s Institute of Mechanical Engineers and alumnus of the Royal Academy of Engineering’s Engineering Leadership Award program.

Richard Riley can comment on:
·         Indian Point closure announcement
·         NYC/NYS clean energy economy
·         Expertise on running a cleantech company

Contact: Please direct media inquiries to Jordan Isenstadt of MarinoPR at JIsenstadt@marinopr.com 


About Highview

Highview Power Storage is a designer and developer of large-scale energy storage solutions for utility and distributed power systems that use liquid air as the storage medium. Highview can design bespoke Liquid Air Energy Storage (LAES) plants that can deliver from 5MW/15MWh – to more than 200MW/1.2GWh to service a growing multi-billion dollar energy storage market. LAES has been developed using proven components from industry to deliver a pumped-hydro capability without geographical constraints, and can be configured to convert waste heat and cold to power.

At the end of 2013 Highview signed a global licencing and technology collaboration agreement, with GE Oil & Gas, to develop the integration of Highview’s LAES technology into its peaker plant offering.

For more information, please visit: www.highview-power.com


Mark Arce
Assistant Account Executive

Marıno.
747 Third Avenue | Floor 18 | New York, NY 10017


Atul Gawande: How To Heal Medicine




Published on Apr 16, 2012
http://www.ted.com Our medical systems are broken. Doctors are capable of extraordinary (and expensive) treatments, but they are losing their core focus: actually treating people. Doctor and writer Atul Gawande suggests we take a step back and look at new ways to do medicine -- with fewer cowboys and more pit crews.



Sunday, December 11, 2016

We have to be willing to change




A seed is destroyed in the process of being a plant. We have to be willing to our old identity to transform into a new being. ..







Wednesday, December 7, 2016

"Consciousness is everywhere"


 
 
Neuroscience Is Learning What Buddhism Has Known For Ages: "Consciousness is everywhere": 

 
 
 

Unchanging Man




The Wisdom of Bill Bernbach

Despite access to more customer information than ever before product messages are clicking less often with customers. The inescapable truth is we know less about customers than we should, given the $6 billion a year companies spend trying to figure out what makes them tick.
Bill Bernbach, one of advertising’s greatest minds, would understand the problem:
“Human nature hasn’t changed for a million years. It won’t even change in the next million years. Only the superficial things have changed. It is fashionable to talk about the changing man. A communicator must be concerned with the unchanging man – what compulsions drive him, what instincts dominate his every action, even though his language too often camouflages what really motivates him.”
Bernbach was not a psychologist, but had an uncanny intuitive grasp of human behavior. While most of us may lack the intuitive competence of Bernbach, we can get to know our customers better by acquiring a deeper understanding of unchanging man. But we cannot get that understanding through traditional customer research.
Renown brain scientist Richard Restak has observed that "We have reason to doubt that full awareness of our motives, drives, and other mental activities may be possible." 
Cognitive scientists tell us that with the aid of new brain canning technology, they’ve learned that about 95 percent of the mental activity going into our decision-making takes place behind the curtains of consciousness. Yet, most consumer research concentrates exclusively on the contents of consumers’ conscious minds.

The roots of motivations lie beyond the knowing reach of our conscious minds. When people tell researchers’ why they do what they do, they can only speak to what appears on the screens of their conscious minds. Those images are often at odds with their more primal sources of motivations.

Marketing mostly ignores the silent 95 percent zone in the brain. Why? The “superficial things” that show up in the conscious mind are more visible, measurable and quantifiable. Companies feel more comfortable with the measurable, so they spend vast sums researching customers’ superficial attributes. Procter and Gamble alone conducts 4,000 to 5,000 customer studies a year.
It’s harder to quantify “what compulsions drive customers, what instincts dominate their every action.” To fathom the unchanging man requires understanding behavior at its roots in human biology.


Ever wonder how cravings develop? Be they for sex or chocolate, they are not consciously created. It’s 3:30 PM. Your energy is sagging. A small organ over your kidneys senses a sugar shortage and sets off a flow of neuropeptide Y to alert your brain of a need for carbs. The plea reaches your conscious mind as a craving for chocolate. You ponder whether to stick to your diet or give in, then say to yourself, “What the hell,” pop a piece of Godiva in your mouth and resolve to eat salad for dinner. You enjoy the moment by giving into the craving.
While you exercised free will (hopefully!) in reacting to the craving, the action you took had its roots in your biology. So it is with behavior in general. 

That’s lesson #1 in understanding unchanging man.

IDEAS


15 Amazing Quotes By Carl Jung That Will Help You To Better Understand Yourself:
 

Speak With Kindness: How The Words You Use Can Literally Change Your Brain:
 
Recent studies suggest that nature can help our brains and bodies to stay healthy.

13 Native American Quotes That Will Open Your Mind
via
 

John Oliver Brilliantly Takes Down All Those BS ‘Scientific Studies’




Mindful Living@mindfulive Nov 23
A Tibetan Monk Reveals the Best Way to Deal With Toxic People
  via

Ideapod@ideas 

A global community for the curious and open-minded.

Earth
Joined June 2011

  

Leonard Cohen: Hallelujah




Leonard Cohen Credit Dominique Issermann


  Leonard Cohen: Darkness and Praise

The email from the boy began: “Did anything inspire you to create Hallelujah?"

Later that same winter day the reply arrived: 

“I wanted to stand with those who clearly see God’s holy broken world for what it is, and still find the courage or the heart to praise it. You don’t always get what you want. You’re not always up for the challenge. But in this case — it was given to me. For which I am deeply grateful.”
The question came from the author's son, who was preparing to present the hymn to his fifth-grade class. The boy required a clarification about its meaning. The answer came from the author of the song, Leonard Cohen.
Cohen lived in a weather of wisdom, which he created by seeking it rather than by finding it. He swam in beauty, because in its transience he aspired to discern a glimpse of eternity.

There was always a trace of philosophy in his sensuality.

He managed to combine a sense of absurdity with a sense of significance, a genuine feat.

He was a friend of melancholy but an enemy of gloom, and a renegade enamored of tradition.
Leonard was, above all, in his music and in his poems and in his tone of life, the lyrical advocate of the finite and the flawed. 
Leonard sang always as a sinner. He refused to describe sin as a failure or a disqualification. Sin was a condition of life. 

“Even though it all went wrong/ I’ll stand before the Lord of song/ With nothing on my tongue but Hallelujah!”
The singer’s faults do not expel him from the divine presence. Instead they confer a mortal integrity upon his exclamation of praise. 

He is the inadequate man, the lowly man, the hurt man who has given hurt, insisting modestly but stubbornly upon his right to a sacred exaltation.

“There is a crack in everything. That’s how the light gets in.”  

He once told an interviewer that those words were the closest he came to a credo.  

The teaching could not be more plain: fix the crack, lose the light.
  
Here is a passage on frivolity by a great rabbi in Prague at the end of the 16th century:

“Man was born for toil, since his perfection is always being actualized but is never actual,” 
he observed in an essay on frivolity.
“And insofar as he attains perfection, something is missing in him.  In such a being, perfection is a shortcoming and a lack.”

Leonard Cohen was the poet laureate of the lack, the psalmist of the privation, who made imperfection gorgeous.

Link: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/14/opinion/my-friend-leonard-cohen-darkness-and-praise.html?ribbon-ad-idx=3&src=trending



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